Archive for July, 2018


Creole Word of the Week: Konbit

In a more specific context, a konbit  is a type of cooperative labor exchange that the farming system in Haiti once relied on.  A landowner would invite people to help clear, till, plant, weed, or harvest their field. They would provide a meal for the workers, and usually reciprocate by helping those workers in their own fields. This system of solidarity has virtually disappeared in Haiti. However, the term remains very popular in contemporary Haiti. It is used to refer to any type of collective work.

More about konbit from our online dictionary.

With over 20,000 entries, this is the largest English <> Haitian Creole dictionary available online. It will help you find the Creole translations in context of English words along with examples of use. This dictionary continues to grow and improve as well. Click here!

Creole Word of the Week: Kongo

The term “kongo” is interesting because while it can be used as a way to describe a of sense pride, it can also be used as an insult.  Haitians who embrace their African ancestry proudly define themselves as “pure kongos”.  On the contrary,  it is often used as a  pejorative term to describe someone who is submissive or unsophisticated from the countryside. It is also used to describe someone who is dressed in a ridiculous way. This expression comes from the fact that the Africans from the Congo tribe liked to wear bright colors. This contrast is a true reflection of Haitian society; there are those who are proud of their African roots, and there are those who make a mockery of out it.    

More about kongo from our online dictionary.

With over 20,000 entries, this is the largest English <> Haitian Creole dictionary available online. It will help you find the Creole translations in context of English words along with examples of use. This dictionary continues to grow and improve as well. Click here!

Creole Word of the Week: Mawon

The word « mawon », or « maroon » in English, is derived from the American Spanish word cimarrón, meaning “wild” or “untamed”. The word was first used in Hispaniola (now Haiti and the Dominican Republic) to refer to feral cattle. In the early days of the colonial period, it was used to refer to enslaved indigenous peoples who escaped to the hills. By the early 1530s, it was used to refer to African slaves who did the same and mixed with the indigenous peoples to form independent settlements throughout the Americas. Some suggest that the word derives ultimately from the Arawakan root word simarabo, construed as “fugitive”, in the Arawakan language spoken by the Taíno people native to the island. In contemporary Haiti, mawon refers to someone who is hiding.

More about mawon from our online dictionary.

With over 20,000 entries, this is the largest English <> Haitian Creole dictionary available online. It will help you find the Creole translations in context of English words along with examples of use. This dictionary continues to grow and improve as well. Click here!

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